Marcellus Shale Newswire 07/01/2011

Vol. 2, Issue 16
PennEnvironment
Last updated: 1/30/2012

Delaware Daily Times

Natural gas impact fee plans dead until fall in Pa.

By Eric Boehm

June 29, 2011

http://delcotimes.com/articles/2011/06/29/news/doc4e0af6f3ae912434952679...

Republican legislative leaders decided to put off imposing an impact fee on natural gas drilling until the fall season. This is due to Governor Corbett saying that he would veto any fee or tax until the Marcellus Shale Commission releases their report in July. 

 

York Dispatch

Sportsmen monitor gas drilling in Marcellus Shale

By Kevin Begos

July 1, 2011

http://www.yorkdispatch.com/nation/ci_18388672

The Sportsmen Alliance for Marcellus Conservation was created by hunters and fisherman who want to help protect their streams and forests from the effects of Marcellus shale gas drilling. It sprouted from hunters and anglers not getting their questions answered by local and state officials. “It didn’t seem like the people who were in charge had their pulse on what was actually happening,” said Ken Dufalla of Clarksville, Pa. 

 

Luzerne County’s Citizens Voice

Shale impact fee push sputters out

By Robert Swift

July 1, 2011

http://citizensvoice.com/news/drilling/shale-impact-fee-push-sputters-out-1.1169503#axzz1QrVOw23M

On Thursday, the Marcellus Shale impact fee proposal was not voted on before the summer legislative recess. This means that the earliest any impact fee or tax would be voted on is September. Senator Dominic from Chester said that inserting it now would bring a veto from Corbett and derail the budget process. 

 

The Pocono Record

N.Y. eyes tighter rules on fracking

July 1, 2011

http://www.poconorecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20110701/NEWS90/107010337/-1/NEWSMAP

New York environmental officials are working to protect the New York City and Syracuse water by proposing a ban on hydraulic fracturing in the watersheds. The Department of Environmental Conservation released details of revisions to gas well permitting which includes the ban in the watersheds and also prohibits drilling in state parks and forest lands. 

 

Wall Street Journal

NJ lawmakers pass ban on gas drilling technique

http://online.wsj.com/article/AP4f609347926a4cad902401a53e1c7067.html

New Jersey's Legislature has passed a ban on the natural gas drilling technique known as hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking." The ban passed 33 to 1 in the state Senate and 58 to 11 in the Assembly on Wednesday. It's now up to Gov. Chris Christie to decide whether to sign or veto the largely symbolic measure. Should he sign it, New Jersey would be the first state in the country to ban fracking. Christie has not said what he'll do.

 

ProPublica

Oil and Gas Drilling Surges Despite Increased Oversight

http://www.propublica.org/article/oil-and-gas-drilling-surges-despite-increased-oversight

Energy companies have spent the last couple of years fighting off added government regulation, saying red tape is slowing development. But recent data show that the pace of drilling is just short of the 20-year high it reached before the recession.

 

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Shale prop goes bonkers

July 1, 2011

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/business/s_744738.html

Penn State University professors John R Hellmann and Barry Scheetz have been studying the “proppants”, the stuff put into oil and gas wells to prop open the tiny cracks created during fracking, of gas drilling. Sand is the most common proppant and the two professors have made their own synthetic proppant called PennProp. It is better for the environment and is made from Pennsylvania mine waste. 

 

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Shale drilling forum produces heat, light

By Dan Majors

June 29, 2011

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11180/1156934-503-0.stm

On Tuesday night, Representative Altmire from McCandless assembled a seven-member panel of experts to answer questions from the public about Marcellus Shale gas drilling. Hundreds of members of the community showed up with questions for scientists and directors from the DEP and the EPA.