Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

In the Path of the Storm

Weather disasters kill or injure hundreds of Americans each year and cause billions of dollars in economic damage. The risks posed by some types of weather-related disasters will likely increase in a warming world. Scientists have already detected increases in extreme precipitation events and heat waves in the United States, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently concluded that global warming will likely lead to further changes in weather extremes.

Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Risky Business: An Analysis of Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling Violations in Pennsylvania 2008-2011

Marcellus Shale gas drilling is expanding rapidly across Pennsylvania. And with it, drilling companies regularly continue to violate Pennsylvania’s cornerstone environmental laws – laws that aim to protect the Commonwealth’s natural heritage and the public’s health.

 

Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Gobbling Less Gas for Thanksgiving

With over 38 million people driving to visit family and friends on trips of at least 50 miles, Americans are expected to spend $552 million at the gas pump this Thanksgiving holiday. However, if the average passenger vehicle met a 54.5 miles per gallon (mpg) standard instead of the current 26.4 mpg standard, Americans would save $260 million at the gas pump on Thanksgiving travel this year and cut gasoline consumption by 75 million gallons.

Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Danger in the Air

All Americans should be able to breathe clean air. But pollution from power plants and vehicles puts the health of our nation’s children and families at risk. Ground-level ozone, the main component of smog, is one of the most harmful and one of the most pervasive air pollutants. This report looks at the number of days that were considered unhealthy for sensitive populations across cities nationwide. The report also shows new data showing the problem is worse than the public thought.

Report | PennEnvironment Research and Policy Center

Grand Canyon at Risk

Uranium mining—which often requires vast open pits, spreads radioactive dust through the air, and leaks radioactivity and toxic chemicals into the environment—is among the riskiest industrial activities in the world. Every uranium mine ever operated in the United States has required some degree of toxic waste cleanup, and the worst have sickened dozens of people, contaminated miles of rivers and streams, and required the cleanup of hundreds of acres of land.

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