Report | PennEnvironment Research and Policy Center

Star Power

Solar power is growing so fast in Pennsylvania that goals once considered ambitious are now seen as readily achievable, according to a new report by the PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center.

“We can get to 15% solar in Pennsylvania if we just keep our foot on the accelerator,” said Elowyn Corby, PennEnvironment’s Clean Energy Associate. “That’s a small fraction of what’s possible, but it will make a big difference in the quality of our lives and the future of our planet.”

Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Lighting the Way

Solar energy is on the rise. Over the course of the last decade, the amount of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity in the United States has increased more than 120-fold, from 97 megawatts in 2003 to more than 12,000 megawatts at the end of 2013. America’s solar energy revolution has been led by 10 states that have the greatest amount of solar energy capacity installed per capita. These 10 states have opened the door for solar energy and are reaping the rewards as a result.

Report

A Talk with Climatologist Michael Mann

PennEnvironment interviewed scientist Michael Mann to learn more about how Pennsylvania can tackle global warming.

Report | PennEnvironment

Shining Cities: At The Forefront of America's Solar Energy Revolution

olar power is on the rise across the country. The United States has more than 200 times as much solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity installed today as it did in 2002. With solar module prices coming down, increasing national awareness of solar energy, and a growing legion of solar businesses large and small, solar power is emerging as a mainstream energy solution with widespread benefits for our health, our economy and the environment.

Report | PennEnvironment

Moving America Forward

American leadership in the fight against global warming is crucial. America is the world’s largest economy, the second-largest emitter of global warming pollution, and the nation responsible for more of the human-caused carbon dioxide pollution in the atmosphere than any other. Without prompt action by the United States and others to reduce global warming pollution, catastrophic impacts – from coastal flooding to food system disruptions – could become unavoidable.

Pages