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News Release | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

New Report: Extreme Downpours and Snowstorms Up 52% Percent in Pennsylvania

Ten months after Tropical Storm Lee led to record flooding that devastated the Susquehanna Valley, a new PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center report confirms that extreme rainstorms and snowstorms are happening 52 percent more frequently in Pennsylvania since 1948. Based on an analysis of state data from the National Climatic Data Center, the new report found that heavy downpours or snowstorms that used to happen once every 12 months on average in the state now happen every 7.9 months on average.  Moreover, the biggest storms are getting bigger.  The largest annual storms in Pennsylvania now produce 23 percent more precipitation, on average, than they did 65 years ago.

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Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

When It Rains, It Pours

Global warming is happening now and its effects are being felt in the United States and around the world. Among the expected consequences of global warming is an increase in the heaviest rain and snow storms, fueled by increased evaporation and the ability of a warmer atmosphere to hold more moisture.

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News Release | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Statement on Commonwealth Court’s Act 13 Decision Erika Staaf, PennEnvironment Clean Water Advocate

PennEnvironment applauds today’s decision by a Commonwealth Court panel that overturned some of the most egregious sections of Act 13, Pennsylvania’s recent—and controversial—gas drilling law.

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News Release | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

New Report Shows Electric Vehicles Ready to Roll in Pennsylvania

With the right policies in place, plug-in vehicles can reduce oil dependence in Pennsylvania by 3,729,012 gallons per year, according to a new report released today by PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center.

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Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Charging Forward: The Emergence of Electric Vehicles and Their Role in Reducing Oil Consumption

America’s reliance on gasoline-powered vehicles has long contributed to air pollution, including global warming emissions, and our nation’s dependence on oil. In the past decade, however, the automobile market has begun to change, integrating new technologies that are dramatically less dependent on gasoline.  Now, fully electric vehicles, with zero direct emissions, are emerging as a market-viable alternative to gasoline-powered vehicles.

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